News & Events

The Institute supports public events that provide the GW community with the opportunity to hear experts address and debate current national security policy issues. Events at the Institute include informal work-in-progress workshops, panel discussions, weekly presentations by experts across multiple disciplines, and academic workshops.

Latest News

Stephen Biddle's New Essay in the Washington Post Monkey Cage

May 15, 2017

Stephen Biddle, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, and his ISCS-affiliate co-authors Julia Macdonald and Ryan Baker, recently published a new essay in the Washington Post's Monkey Cage blog. "The Trump Administration Wants to Send More Military Advisers to Afghanistan. Good Luck With That," analyzes Security Force Assistance and Afghanistan. 

Stephen Biddle's Op-Ed in Fortune, "Trump's Appetite for Risk Spells Trouble for US National Security"

April 10, 2017

Stephen Biddle, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, recently published an op-ed, "Trump's Appetite for Risk Spells Trouble for US National Security," in Fortune. 

Caitlin Talmadge's Op-Ed in the New York Times, "Trump's Military Budget Minus a Plan"

March 27, 2017

Caitlin Talmadge, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, recently published an op-ed, "Trump's Military Budget Minus a Plan," in the New York Times. 

Harris Mylonas' Foreign Affairs Snapshot, "Between Trump and the Troika"

November 22, 2016

Harris Mylonas, Associate Professor of Political Science, recently published Foreign Affairs Snapshot where he discusses President Obama's visit to Greece and the potential impact of Donald Trump's victory on the Greek political system. 

Stephen Biddle's and Jacob Shapiro's New Article in the Atlantic: The Problem with Vows to the Islamic State

August 22, 2016

GW Professor Stephen Biddle and his co-author, Prof. Jacob Shapiro of Princeton, argue in the Atlantic that proposals to escalate or accelerate the campaign in Iraq and Syria in order to hasten ISIS' defeat would accomplish a lot less than commonly supposed. The problem isn't taking Mosul or Raqqa - it's what would come afterward.