Fellows & Visitors

Nicholas Anderson

Nicholas Anderson

Pre-Doctoral Fellow

Nicholas Anderson is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at Yale University.
His research focuses on territorial expansion, historical and contemporary East Asian international
relations, U.S. foreign policy, and nuclear proliferation and deterrence. In the academic year 2018-
2019, he was a predoctoral fellow in the International Security Program at the Harvard Kennedy
School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. He has also held fellowships with the
Japan Foundation’s Center for Global Partnership and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research
Council of Canada. His research and other writings have been published or are forthcoming in
International Security, Political Science Quarterly, The Washington Quarterly, Strategic Studies Quarterly, the
Australian Journal of International Affairs, and International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, among other
outlets. He has an M.A. in Security Studies from Georgetown University (2012) and a B.A. in
Political Science and International Relations (2010) from the University of British Columbia.

Link to CV

Neha Ansari

Neha Ansari

Visiting Scholar

Neha Ansari is a PhD Candidate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, where her doctoral studies focus on International Security and the Geopolitics of the Persian Gulf and South Asia. Her dissertation studies the shift in public opinion on American drone strikes in Pakistan’s tribal belt. Before joining Fletcher for her doctorate, she was a visiting researcher at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, focusing on Pakistan’s strategic culture and the Pakistani media. At the same time, she was also a Research Consultant for the Near East and South Asia (NESA) Center at National Defense University (NDU), Washington, DC. She has consulted for Sandia National Laboratories, given presentations and briefings to numerous military-security forums, including the U.S. Army’s Asymmetric Warfare Group (AWG) and the U.S. Joint Staff’s Strategic Multilayer Conference. She was a Fulbright Scholar and has also been supported by the Eisenhower Roberts Graduate Fellowship, the Sarah Scaife Foundation, and the Bradley Foundation. She is originally from Karachi, Pakistan, where she previously worked as a journalist. She holds a Master of Arts in Law & Diplomacy (MALD) from the Fletcher School, and an M.A. and B.A. (Honors) from the University of Karachi, Pakistan.    

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Andrew Bowen

Andrew Bowen

Visiting Scholar

Andrew is a PhD Candidate in Political Science at Boston College specializing in International Relations. His research has been supported by the Tobin project and the Smith Richardson Foundation among others. He is currently working on his dissertation that examines the causes of costly signaling success and failure during the Cold War. His project seeks to understand why the US correctly, and incorrectly, interpreted Soviet attempts at communication. The findings of the project contribute not only to International Relations theory and Cold War history, but have current policy implications as the United States seeks to interpret the actions of other states. Additionally, his work has appeared in such places as Journal of Strategic Studies, Washington Post, Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, Jane’s Intelligence Review, The National Interest, The Daily Beast, The Moscow Times and The Diplomat.

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Elenia Ekmektsioglou

Elenia Ekmektsioglou

Visiting Scholar

Eleni Ekmektsioglou is a PhD candidate and an adjunct instructor at American University’s School of International Service. Her dissertation seeks to explain variation in state reactions to new military technologies. Her broader research interests include technological innovation in strategic weapon systems and their impact on crisis stability, international security in East Asia and China’s nuclear and naval strategy. Before starting her doctoral studies at American University, Eleni was a research fellow at Pacific Forum CSIS. She has also worked as a project coordinator at the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS) and at the European Institute for Asia Studies (EIAS). She holds a Master’s degree from the King’s College London War Studies department and a Bachelor’s degree from Panteion University of Athens while she has spent one year in Sciences Po Lille as an exchange student. She has written opinion pieces for online magazines such as The Diplomat or the National Interest and more extensive analyses for journals such as the Strategic Studies Quarterly.
Awards: Recipient of the William C. Olson award for outstanding teaching by a PhD student and AU SIS Summer Grant for archival research 2018.
Dani Gilbert

Dani Gilbert

PhD in Residence

Danielle Gilbert is a PhD candidate in Political Science at the George Washington University and a 2018-2019 Minerva/Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar at the United States Institute of Peace. She studies comparative politics and international relations with a multi-method approach to examining the causes and consequences of violence. Her dissertation, “The Strategic Logic of Political Kidnapping,” examines the hostage-taking strategies of non-state groups, leveraging evidence from interviews with ex-combatants from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, as well as an original dataset of nearly 1,900 violent, political organizations.

Danielle’s work has been supported by the Cosmos Club, the Bridging the Gap Project, the S. Daniel Abraham Center for Middle East Peace, the Les Aspin ’60 Summer Fellowship, and the Georg W. Leitner Program in International and Comparative Political Economy at Yale. She has published in the journal Terrorism & Political Violence and has written for War on the Rocks and The Monkey Cage. For the past three years, Danielle has served as a fellow with the Bridging the Gap Project, where she manages the annual New Era Workshop. Prior to her graduate studies, she served four years on Capitol Hill, including as a Senior Legislative Assistant and Appropriations Associate, and has worked as a policy advisor on presidential and congressional campaigns.

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Renanah Miles Joyce

Renanah Miles Joyce

Pre-Doctoral Fellow

Renanah Miles Joyce is a PhD Candidate in Political Science at Columbia University, where her research spans international security, comparative civil-military relations and US foreign policy. Her dissertation explores the ways that great powers use security assistance as an instrument both to build warfighting capacity and to impart their preferred values and norms in developing militaries. In other work, she examines different tools of military statecraft and asymmetric bargaining between both state and non-state actors. Renanah holds an MA in security studies from Georgetown University and a BA in international community development from Oral Roberts University. Before graduate school, Renanah worked for the US Department of Defense as a program analyst.

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Alex Kirss

Alex Kirss

PhD in Residence

Alexander is a PhD student in Political Science at the George Washington University. He previously earned his MA in International Relations from the University of Chicago and BA in Political Science from Williams College. His research interests include the effect of nuclear weapons on conflict, political ambition, and strategic choice in declining powers.

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Kendrick Kuo

Kendrick Kuo

PhD in Residence

Kendrick Kuo is a PhD student in political science at the George Washington University. His research focuses on international security, military effectiveness, and innovation. He also studies nationalism, with country expertise in China. He holds an M.A. in International Affairs and International Economics from Johns Hopkins SAIS and a B.A. in International Affairs and Religion from the George Washington University. He also received a FLAS to study Chinese at Tsinghua University and a Boren Scholarship to study Arabic at the University of Jordan.

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CV

Igor Kovac

Igor Kovac

Pre-Doctoral Fellow

Igor is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at the University of Cincinnati. His dissertation develops a theory of persistent imbalance of power – Pervasive Hegemony. Using network analysis, time series, and case study of the US hegemony after the end of the Cold War he argues that it is the unchanged central position of the US within the global economy that characterizes its hegemony. Moreover, this also reflects a different, so far unexplored, type of dynamic in international relations – ‘buy-in’. Igor holds a M.A. in International Studies from Vienna School of International Studies, M.S. in Sport Science, and a B.Sc. in International Relations, both from University of Ljubljana respectively.

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DoYoung Lee

DoYoung Lee

Visiting Scholar

DoYoung Lee is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago. His research interests include strategies of extended deterrence, the effect of nuclear weapons on interstate conflict, and alliance politics. His dissertation project examines nuclear patron states’ strategies of extended deterrence to non-nuclear client states. He holds a BA and an MA degree in Political Science from Korea University, South Korea. His research has been funded by the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Charles Koch Foundation, the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, and the University of Chicago.

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Shahryar Pasandideh

Shahryar Pasandideh

PhD in Residence

Shahryar Pasandideh is a PhD student in the Department of Political Science at The George Washington University. His research focuses on assessments of military power, the development and diffusion of military technologies, military operations and effectiveness, and regional security issues in the Gulf region and the Indo-Pacific. He earned a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) from Trinity College, University of Toronto, majoring in International Relations and Middle Eastern History.

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Brian Radzinksy

Brian Radzinksy

PhD in Residence

Brian Radzinsky is a PhD candidate in the political science department at the George Washington University. His research focuses on nuclear strategy, extended deterrence, and emerging technologies. His dissertation examines the effects of grand strategy, conventional military power, and civilian technological innovation on the nuclear postures of the United States, Russia, and other nuclear powers. He is also a fellow with the Elliott School’s Nuclear Security Working Group. Previously, he’s served as a predoctoral researcher at the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and managed cooperative nuclear security projects at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He has a BA in political science from Reed College.

 

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Stephen Roblin

Stephen Roblin

Visiting Scholar

Stephen Roblin is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Cornell University. He examines the effect of U.S. harm to foreign civilians and anti-war messaging on American public  opinion. His dissertation, “The Moral Public: Intent, Noncombatant Immunity, and American Public Support for War,” examines how wartime civilian harm by the U.S. military affects American public attitudes towards war by leveraging evidence from original survey experiments and case studies. This project could not have been possible without support from the Dolores Zohrab Liebmann Fund, American Political Science Association Centennial Center, Tobin Project, and American Studies Program at Cornell. Stephen is committed to using his research to support activists, NGOs and policymakers working to mitigate and prevent the human costs of war. He is currently collaborating with Research 4 Impact, an organization
that facilitates exchange between academics and practitioners. He has published in the journals,International Interactions and Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal.
Prior to his graduate studies, Stephen was the lead fiscal manager for the Office of Public Health and Emergency Preparedness at the Baltimore County Department of Health and served as a public relations specialist for the department during the H1N1 flu pandemic. He earned his masters at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy in 2009 and his BA at Morgan State University in 2006.

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